What are April’s new family history records?

By Rosemary Collins, 4 April 2019 - 11:43am

This month, TheGenealogist introduces a new Map Explorer feature, Surrey parish records go online at FamilySearch and more

TheGenealogist map explorer
A map of London on TheGenealogist's Map Explorer, including Lloyd George Domesday Survey records

Tracing your family history has become easier than ever as more and more records are being released online. We've put together a handy guide to help you discover the latest datasets for researching your ancestors.

This month, we take a look at TheGenealogist's new Map Explorer feature, free Surrey parish records on FamilySearch and more.

 

TheGenealogist

What's been added?

TheGenealogist has unveiled a new Map Explorer feature, using georeferencing to overlay historic maps on modern backgrounds. As part of the launch, it has digitised the1910 Lloyd George Domesday Survey maps for the whole of Greater London, and published four sets of historic Ordnance Survey maps of England, Scotland and Wales: 1893-1900s (1:1,056 scale), 1919-1947 (1:63,360), 1936-1961 (1:25,000) and 1955-1961 (1:63,360).

What can the records tell you?

You can search the Map Explorer by postcode, town and city and view the different layers on top of each other, showing the places where your ancestors lived and how they changed over time. It also includes georeferenced ‘pins’ showing where TheGenealogist has records for the properties depicted. Currently these cover the Domesday Survey field books for north-west London.

Where do they come from?

The 1910 Land Valuation Survey, or ‘Domesday’ survey, was introduced by then chancellor David Lloyd George to calculate the value of properties in Britain. The field books and maps reveal the names and addresses of people living in Britain at the time, as well as a description of the property. The original records are held at The National Archives and are in the process of being digitised by TheGenealogist. The new Ordnance Survey maps are licensed from the National Library of Scotland.

 

FamilySearch

What's been added?

FamilySearch has added a new indexed collection of 2,554,396 Surrey parish records (1536-1992).

What can the records tell you?

Parish records include baptisms, marriages and burials, potentially revealing details such as your ancestors’ dates and places of birth, marriage and death, as well as the names of their parents and spouses.

Where do the records come from?

The records are transcribed from the London Metropolitan Archives.

 

Ancestry

What's been added? 

Ancestry has added a Cork, Ireland Marriage Licence Bonds Index, 1623-1750.

What can the records tell you? 

Some marriages were conducted by a couple buying a marriage licence from the bishop of the diocese, usually so that they didn’t have to have the banns read out. In some cases they would need to pay a bond before purchasing a licence, in order to ensure that the marriage was legally solvent.

These records will tell you the names of the spouses and the year of the marriage. They cover Cork and Ross and were kept by the Church of Ireland, although they occasionally Catholic couples also entered into these bonds.

Where do the records come from?

The records are taken from the Index to the Marriage Licence Bonds of the Diocese of Cork and Ross, Ireland, published by Herbert Webb Gilman in 1897. It was copied from records held in Dublin’s Public Record Office, where many of the documents were destroyed in a fire in 1922 during the Irish Civil War.

 

Other records

Findmypast has added 31,000 more records to the Berkshire Baptisms Index, covering the parishes of Beenham St Mary, Bray St Michael, Cholsey St Mary, Kintbury St Mary, Reading St Giles, Reading St Mary, Remenham St Nicholas and Tilehurst St Michael, and 62,000 more records to its collection of United States Passport Applications, dating from 1795 to 1925.

A new website, Peterloo1819, has been launched to commemorate the 200th anniversary of Peterloo. It includes an interactive 3D model showing how the massacre at Manchester’s St Peter’s Field, in which 18 people were killed, unfolded.

The University of Cambridge is in the process of publishing its collection of historic aerial photographs online. 1,500 pictures dating from 1945 to 2009 have been added so far, with a collection of almost 500,000 due to be added eventually.

 

 

 

 

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