From the office: Cutting our coat to suit our cloth

By Editor, 23 February 2017 - 1:03pm

After years of producing a weekly e-newsletter we will be moving to a new and improved monthly format. Who Do You Think You Are? Magazine editor Sarah Williams explains why...

Sarah Williams is editor at Who Do You Think You Are? MagazineThursday 23 February 2017
Sarah Williams, Editor
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You've got to cut your coat according to your cloth. That's what I thought when I looked at the hole in our team left when our deputy editor, Claire, left.

My mother was a big one for sayings that ranged from the usual "a stitch in time saves nine" to the more peculiar "fine words butter no parsnips" – a phrase that so endeared me to one gentleman he ended up marrying me.

So when I was left with a hole in the team, even though it is only temporary, I realised that the cut of our coat was going to have to change.

We have promoted the wonderfully capable Jon Bauckham to features editor but we currently have no one to replace him (we do plan to recruit a new editorial assistant eventually). In the interim, however, we have just four of us doing the work of five people and we need to adapt.

In light of this, we will be trialling a monthly e-newsletter instead of our weekly one. I know that thousands of readers appreciate the work that Jon does putting together his weekly roundup of genealogy news and his guide to the week's TV and radio, but, as you can guess, it is very time-consuming and there are weeks when news is thin on the ground and we wonder how useful the email is.

I hope that by turning the newsletter into a monthly roundup we will be able to concentrate on bigger news stories and free Jon's time up to focus more on giving our readers the very best family history magazine.

This is just a trial, and when we have a new editorial assistant in place we will re-assess the frequency of the newsletter. We may find that a monthly email works better for everyone – after all, the proof of the pudding is in the eating.

 

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